Prisoner Exchange Cartel of July 22, 1862


Between the United States and the Confederate States Governments



Article 1.
It is hereby agreed and stipulated that all prisoners of war held by either party, including those taken on private armed vessels known as privateers, shall be discharged upon the conditions and terms following:
Prisoners to be exchanged man for man and officer for officer; privateers to be placed upon the footing of officers and men of the navy.
Men and Officers of lower grades may be exchanged for officers of a higher grade, and men and officers of different services may be exchanged according to the following scale of equivalents:
A general commanding-in-chief or an admiral shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or for sixty privates or common seamen.

A flag-officer or major-general shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or for forty privates or common seamen.

A commodore carrying a broad pennant or a brigadier-general shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or for twenty privates or common seamen.

A captain in the navy or a colonel shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or for fifteen privates or common seamen

A lieutenant-colonel or a commander in the navy shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or for ten privates or common seamen.

A lieutenant-commander or a major shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or for eight privates or common seamen.

A lieutenant or a master in the navy or a captain in army or marines shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or for four privates or common seamen.

Masters' mates in the navy or lieutenantsand ensigns in the army shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or for three privates or common seamen.

Second Captains, lieutenants, or mates of merchantvessels or privateers, and all petty officers in the navy, and all noncommisiioned offiecrs in the army or marines shall be severally exchanged for persons of equal rank, or for two privates or common seamen, and private soldiers or common seamen shall be exchanged for each other, man for man.

Article 2.
Local, State, civil, and militia rank held by persons not in actual military service will not be recognized, the basis of exchange being the grade actually held in the naval and military service of the respective parties.

Article 3.
If citizens held by either party on charges of disloyalty or any alleged civil offenses are exchanged, it shall only be for citizens. Captured sutlers, teamsters, and all civilians in the actual service of either party to be exchanged for persons in similar position.

Article 4.
All prisoners of war to be discharged on parole in ten days after their capture, and the prisoners now held and those thereafter taken to be transported to the points mutually agreed upon at the expense of the capturing party. The surplus prisoners not exchanged shall not be permitted to take up arms again, nor to serve as military police or constabulary force in any fort, garrison, or fieldwork held by either of the respective parties, nor as guards of prisons, depots, or stores, nor to doscharge any duty usually performed by soldiers, unitl exchanged under the provisions of this cartel. The exchange is not to be considered complete until the officer or soldier exchanged for has been actually restored to the lines to which he belongs.

Article 5.
Each party, upon the discharge of prisoners of the other party, is authorized to discharge an equal number of their own officers or men from parole, furnishing at the same time to the other party a list of their prisoners discharged and of their own officers and men relieved from parole, thus enabling each party to relieve from parole such of their own officers and men as the party may choose. The lists thus mutually furnished will keep both parties advised of the true condition of the exchange of prisoners.

Article 6.
The stipulations and provisions above mentioned to be of binding obligation during the continuance of the war, it matters not which party may have the surplus of prisoners, the great principles involved being, first, and equitable exchange of prisoners, man for man, officer for officer, or officers of higher grade fo officers of lower grade or for privates, according to the scale of equivalents; second, that privateers and officers and men of different services may be exchanged according to the same scale of equivalents; third, that all prisoners, of whatever arm of service, are to be exchanged or paroled in ten days from the time of their capture, if it be practicable to transfer them to thier own lines in that time; if not, as soon thereafter as practicable; fourth, that no officer, soldier, or employee, in the service of either party, is to be cinsidered as exchanged and absolved from his parole until his equivalent has actually reached the lines of his friends; fifth, that the parole forbids performance of field, garrison, police, or guard, or constabulary duty.

Signed: John A. Dix, Major-General, USA
D.H. Hill, Major-General, CSA



If you have any questions or comments,
email me at: 1st Sgt. Lindsey


back home